Archive for February, 2010

Souki’s Bill Turned into “Study”

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

Saner members of the Legislature, realizing that the State of Hawai’i could not take on subsidizing a ferry system, deflected Souki’s bill proposing a State-run high speed ferry system by turning it into a “study”.

The State of Washington has pretty much eliminated highspeed ferries due to their high fuel use and destructive wakes.  Their ferry fleet is much more fuel-efficient and goes half the distance that a Hawai’i ferry would travel.

Yet Washington is obliged to kick in 50% of the operating costs.  Doing the math, it would suggest that the State of Hawai’i would have to subsidize at least 75% of the cost of  ferries traveling between Oahu, Maui, Kaua’i and the Big Island.

Estimates were that the Maui run of the Hawai’i Superferry may have been loosing between  $100,000 and $300,000 per week.  Adding the long Big Island and Kaua’i routes and the State could be paying a minimum of $300,000 per week or $15 to $46 million per year.

What was Souki thinking?

DOT Confirms Possible Army Superferries

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

Mike Formby, deputy director of the state Department of Transportation Harbors Division, said yesterday the impacts are unclear should the Army decide to base one or more of the 338-foot catamarans in Hawai’i.
“One thing we don’t know that needs to be fleshed out is where the vessels are going to operate, if they are deployed or positioned in Pearl Harbor,” Formby said. “Are they going to go to Pōhakuloa (Training Area) on the Big Island? Are they going to use our state piers? Where are they going to offload their military equipment and troops? None of that has been discussed with the state.”

Souki’s Bill Will Bring Back Superferry Without EIS

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Joe Souki is at it again. He’s introduced HB2667 which will remove any future Superferry from either County or EIS review.  Please send testimony opposing this here.

To submit testimony go here, put in the bill # (HB26657), press [Get Latest Hearing]

Then fill in the info and your comments and press  [submit]

Landfill Leachate May Explain Spike in Ocean Staph

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Turns out the leachate from the Landfill is going through the Kahului Waste Water plant.  This may explain the recent (last couple years) rise in staph infections for those using the waters around Kahului.  It was counter-intuitive that infections were going up while cruise ship use was declining.  So it may be the injection wells which we have evidence are flowing into the ocean off Kahului.

Army Wants to Bring Back Superferry

Monday, February 8th, 2010

Source: See Page 8
http://oeqc.doh.hawaii.gov/Shared%20Documents/Environmental_Notice/current_issue.pdf

FEDERAL NOTICES

Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Stationing and Operation of Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs)

The Army intends to prepare a PEIS for the proposed stationing and operation of up to 12 JHSVs. The JHSV is a strategic transport vessel that is designed to support the rapid transport of Army Soldiers, other military personnel and equipment in the U.S. and abroad. The PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed stationing of JHSVs at the following military port locations: Virginia Tidewater area; San Diego, CA area; Seattle-Tacoma, WA area; Pearl Harbor, HI area; and Guam. These locations were selected based on the following criteria: sites have existing military port facilities that do not require new infrastructure construction or improvements; sites have existing maintenance facilities for up to, but not including, depot level facilities for major JHSV repairs and maintenance; and sites are capable of supporting the strategic needs of the nation’s Combatant Commanders. Not all of the proposed ports will receive JHSVs and other viable locations raised during public scoping may be considered as stationing sites. The Army’s Record of Decision will make the determination as to which of the potential sites will serve as home port locations.

The Army intends to consider the following alternatives in the PEIS: (1) The stationing and operation of an Army-wide total of five JHSVs at military port facilities in the U.S. or U.S. territories, with up to three JHSVs at any one of the aforementioned locations; (2) The stationing and operation of an Army-wide total of up to 12 JHSVs at military port facilities in the U.S. or U.S. territories and overseas locations operated by the U.S. military, with up to three JHSV’s being stationed at any one location; and (3) The no action alternative which retains the Army’s existing transport fleet and does not equip the Army with JHSVs. Under the no action alternative, the Army would not be able to increase its expeditionary capability as discussed as a key requirement in the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) nor would it meet the rapid deployment goals of Army Transformation.

The JHSV will require fueling-at-sea training; aviation training (helicopter); live fire training; and high-speed, open-water-craft training. It is anticipated that the vessel will spend 150 days or more away from the home station. These home-station sites would only be used to support JHSV berthing and training requirements in and around the stationing location for 170 days per year. An annual maintenance cycle of approximately 45 days would occur at the home station or at another location, if appropriate maintenance facilities are not on site. The PEIS will include evaluation of the different locations which could reasonably accommodate, support, and sustain the JHSV and meet its requirements for live-fire training.

The proposed action will require the Army to balance strategic, sustainment, and environmental considerations to provide greater flexibility and responsiveness to meet today’s evolving world conditions and threats to national defense and security. The PEIS will analyze the proposed action’s impacts upon the natural, cultural, and manmade environments at the alternative home-stationing sites.

Comments may be sent to: Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Environmental Command, Attention: IMAE-PA, 5179 Hoadley Rd., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5401. For further information contact: Public Affairs Office at (410) 436-2556; fax (410) 436-1693; or e-mail: APGR-USAECNEPA@conus.army.mil.

The JHSV is a high-speed, shallow-draft vessel capable of rapid intra-theater transport of Army units. JHSV stationing detachments consist of a 31 member crew and can accommodate up to 350 additional Soldiers. The vessel can reach speeds of 35-45 knots and has an equipment carrying capacity of approximately 700 short tons. It has a shallow draft of 12.5 feet for enhanced port access for the types of austere piers and quay walls common in developing countries. The JHSV includes a weapons mount for crew served weapons, a flight deck for helicopter operations, and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to drive off the ship quickly. These characteristics make the JHSV an extremely flexible asset, able to support a wide range of operations including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport.

The PEIS will assess, consider, and compare the direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental effects from the stationing of up to three Army JHSVs per site. The primary environmental issues to be analyzed will include potential impacts to air quality, airspace, cultural resources, noise, and marine life. In addition, the Army will consider those issues identified as the part of the scoping process.

All interested members of the public, including native communities and federally recognized Native American Tribes, Native Hawaiian groups, Guam Chamorro Groups, and federal, state, and local agencies, are invited to participate in the scoping process for the preparation of this PEIS. Written comments identifying environmental issues, concerns and opportunities to be analyzed in the PEIS will be accepted for 30 days following publication of the Notice of Intent in the Federal Register. There will be no on-site scoping meetings.

Source: See Page 8

FEDERAL NOTICES

Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Stationing and Operation of Joint High Speed Vessels (JHSVs)

The Army intends to prepare a PEIS for the proposed stationing and operation of up to 12 JHSVs. The JHSV is a strategic transport vessel that is designed to support the rapid transport of Army Soldiers, other military personnel and equipment in the U.S. and abroad. The PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed stationing of JHSVs at the following military port locations: Virginia Tidewater area; San Diego, CA area; Seattle-Tacoma, WA area; Pearl Harbor, HI area; and Guam. These locations were selected based on the following criteria: sites have existing military port facilities that do not require new infrastructure construction or improvements; sites have existing maintenance facilities for up to, but not including, depot level facilities for major JHSV repairs and maintenance; and sites are capable of supporting the strategic needs of the nation’s Combatant Commanders. Not all of the proposed ports will receive JHSVs and other viable locations raised during public scoping may be considered as stationing sites. The Army’s Record of Decision will make the determination as to which of the potential sites will serve as home port locations.

The Army intends to consider the following alternatives in the PEIS: (1) The stationing and operation of an Army-wide total of five JHSVs at military port facilities in the U.S. or U.S. territories, with up to three JHSVs at any one of the aforementioned locations; (2) The stationing and operation of an Army-wide total of up to 12 JHSVs at military port facilities in the U.S. or U.S. territories and overseas locations operated by the U.S. military, with up to three JHSV’s being stationed at any one location; and (3) The no action alternative which retains the Army’s existing transport fleet and does not equip the Army with JHSVs. Under the no action alternative, the Army would not be able to increase its expeditionary capability as discussed as a key requirement in the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) nor would it meet the rapid deployment goals of Army Transformation.

The JHSV will require fueling-at-sea training; aviation training (helicopter); live fire training; and high-speed, open-water-craft training. It is anticipated that the vessel will spend 150 days or more away from the home station. These home-station sites would only be used to support JHSV berthing and training requirements in and around the stationing location for 170 days per year. An annual maintenance cycle of approximately 45 days would occur at the home station or at another location, if appropriate maintenance facilities are not on site. The PEIS will include evaluation of the different locations which could reasonably accommodate, support, and sustain the JHSV and meet its requirements for live-fire training.

The proposed action will require the Army to balance strategic, sustainment, and environmental considerations to provide greater flexibility and responsiveness to meet today’s evolving world conditions and threats to national defense and security. The PEIS will analyze the proposed action’s impacts upon the natural, cultural, and manmade environments at the alternative home-stationing sites.

Comments may be sent to: Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Environmental Command, Attention: IMAE-PA, 5179 Hoadley Rd., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5401. For further information contact: Public Affairs Office at (410) 436-2556; fax (410) 436-1693; or e-mail: APGR-USAECNEPA@conus.army.mil.

The JHSV is a high-speed, shallow-draft vessel capable of rapid intra-theater transport of Army units. JHSV stationing detachments consist of a 31 member crew and can accommodate up to 350 additional Soldiers. The vessel can reach speeds of 35-45 knots and has an equipment carrying capacity of approximately 700 short tons. It has a shallow draft of 12.5 feet for enhanced port access for the types of austere piers and quay walls common in developing countries. The JHSV includes a weapons mount for crew served weapons, a flight deck for helicopter operations, and an off-load ramp that allows vehicles to drive off the ship quickly. These characteristics make the JHSV an extremely flexible asset, able to support a wide range of operations including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport.

The PEIS will assess, consider, and compare the direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental effects from the stationing of up to three Army JHSVs per site. The primary environmental issues to be analyzed will include potential impacts to air quality, airspace, cultural resources, noise, and marine life. In addition, the Army will consider those issues identified as the part of the scoping process.

All interested members of the public, including native communities and federally recognized Native American Tribes, Native Hawaiian groups, Guam Chamorro Groups, and federal, state, and local agencies, are invited to participate in the scoping process for the preparation of this PEIS. Written comments identifying environmental issues, concerns and opportunities to be analyzed in the PEIS will be accepted for 30 days following publication of the Notice of Intent in the Federal Register. There will be no on-site scoping meetings.

Revenge of the Superferry

Saturday, February 6th, 2010

From  DMZ Hawaii

More information on the proposed stationing of Joint High Speed Vessels in Guam, Hawai’i, San Diego and/or Seattle. The Army is currently conducting scoping on a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for stationing of these military fast transport vessels. In Hawai’i a grassroots resistance stopped the Hawaii Superferry, a JHSV disguised as a civilian ferry, through legal and direct action. Proponents of the Hawaii Superferry denied that there was any relationship between their project and the military. Then it turned out that the Hawaii Superferry helped the Austal corporation leverage its position to compete for an win a major contract to build the JHSV based on the same design. Activists who exposed the military agenda behind the Superferry were right all along.

From the Army Website

Joint High Speed Vessel
The Army intends to prepare a programmatic environmental impact statement in 2010 for the proposed stationing and operation of joint high speed vessels. The JHSV is a strategic transport vessel designed to support the rapid transport of military troops and equipment in the U.S. and abroad. All interested members of the public, including native communities and federally recognized Native American Tribes, Native Hawaiian groups, Guam Chamorro Groups, and federal, state, and local agencies are invited to participate in the scoping process for the preparation of this PEIS. Comments may be sent to the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Environmental Command, 5179 Hoadley Rd, Attn: IMAE-PA, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5401; (410) 436-2556; fax (410) 436-1693; e-mail USAEC NEPA.